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Advantages of Buying Real Estate in a “Sketchy” Neighborhood



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By : Greg Eckler    99 or more times read
Everyone wants to buy in a “good” neighborhood – low crime and attractive. However, all the “good” neighborhoods tend to cost more to buy in, making homes there hard to obtain or out of reach for buyers on a budget. However, buying in a less desirable neighborhood may not be all bad. Here are some positive sides to a “sketchy” location:

Cost
Your home will be cheaper than comparable dwellings in other neighborhoods. A few hundred dollars difference can add up into thousands in the long run. You can save it or input it into your principal, paying off your home years earlier.

Buying Power
You can get more house for your money. Instead of a 1 bedroom condo in a “good” part of town, you could possibly afford a single-family home in another area. If you are looking for space, this can be something you might want to consider.

Rental Opportunities
By maintaining your property well, you can have your pick of renters who can’t afford the “good” areas. Many of these are quiet people who know how to treat a home, no matter how much or how little they pay in rent. With careful interviewing and background checks, you can have wonderful tenants and a reliable income stream.

Power of Change
By buying a house in a less prosperous part of town and doing your best to keep your property clean and well-kept, you’re helping your community. Joining an area association dedicated to community improvement can also be a way you can improve your community and bolster community spirit. Block watch programs, getting to know your neighborhoods, sharing tips on home security are all great ways to make your home more secure.

You Can Only Go Up From Here
In a depreciated neighborhood, you don’t have to worry so much about house values going down. In times of economic downturn, lower priced real estate is not as affected as the McMansions in the McRich Neighborhood. Also, your efforts to improve the community can help slowly improve your home’s value, unlike better neighborhoods that are more at the mercy of the pendulum of the economy.

This isn’t to say that you should necessarily invest in a “bad” neighborhood. Sometimes an area can be seriously hazardous to your health. There is potential in every neighborhood, though. With enough citizens who are looking for a better life in an improved neighborhood, the area and consequently your home can be improved to the point where you’re actually living in a pretty nice place.


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