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Energy Saving Power Tools



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By : Jerry Clifford    99 or more times read
Visit any big box home store and it appears, this summer, power saving power tools are all the rage. Replacing their gas powered counterparts, these battery or propane operated lawn maintenance tools run on alternative energy sources that both lower emissions and boast less maintenance.

Some of this year's highlights include:

Ariens Co. of Brillion, Wis., has unveiled the $3,299 "AMP Rider" electric-motor mower, run by rechargeable lead-acid batteries and never needs an oil-change.

Valley City, Ohio-based MTD Products Inc.'s Troy-Bilt brand has a $169 seven-pound lithium-ion battery trimmer that can run up to 45 minutes on a single charge.

No more annoying pumping with Frontgate's battery-powered sprayer that will disperse 18 gallons of liquid per single battery charge.

People-powered push mowers are returning with a vengeance. They have similar designs, but now promise to be quieter, easier to maneuver and lightweight. Some even include attachments for grass catchers.

Earthwise makes a cordless electric mower that provides the ease of operation of an electric mower without the cord. The rechargeable 24 V battery lasts up to 45 minutes. Their cordless chainsaw still requires oil, but it runs on an 18 volt NiCad battery that is compatible with other Earthwise 18 volt tools.

The RoboMower, running anywhere from $1000 to $3000 is a true energy saving device cutting back on both fuel and people power.

Everyone has cordless power tools, but the most efficient are the ones that share a single 18V battery. This means you can use the same battery for all your lawn tools.

One of the most extensive versions of this is offered by Black & Decker who admits to having a bigger selection of cordless trimmers than the corded version. With one 18 V battery you can charge all your Black & Decker battery-operated tools which include surface sweepers, chainsaw, lopper, hedge trimmer, grass trimmer, cultivator, pruning saw, and power scrubber. All of these products boast: " No pull cords. No trips to the gas station. No gas or oil to mix. No gas to store or spill. No fumes. No tune-ups or maintenance."

According to Joe Newland, Black & Decker's product manager for outdoor products. "There are tradeoffs, and what you lose in power, you gain in convenience and weight." He mentions that these products are particularly popular with female users. "They don't want to start with filling it. They just want to use it."

From the numbers, the public is loving these products, and as they become more widespread, prices are coming down. Even the cost of solar lighting and batteries have seen large reductions from a few years ago. Home Depot reported 2008 a record year for non-gas outdoor power equipment. In addition to the regular electric and battery operated mowers, Home Depot sells a version that runs on a 16.4 ounce propane container.

Even heavy duty, gas tool manufacturers are jumping on the "alternative energy" bandwagon. Husqvarna has just unveiled a soil cultivator for $899 that runs off one large lead-acid battery. They have also introduced an "EcoSmart" campaign featuring similar products including their manual push mower and solar-battery robot "Automower".

The government is supporting this new, cleaner technology and incentives are being reviewed that would give consumers a 25% tax credit (up to $1000) toward their purchase of eco friendly lawn, garden or forestry power tools. In addition, the Environmental Protection Agency issued new rules that require manufacturers to reduce emissions from new lawn and garden equipment by 35% in the next few years. If these companies want to remain in business, they have to start examining new, alternative forms of energy.

Currently Husqvarna is testing a high-powered, battery push mower; and Arien plans to introduce a battery-powered snowblower this winter. However the general consensus in the industry is one of caution. No one is quick to unveil a product that may not have the power to do the job. "It's one of those things where we want to be careful," says Roger Phelps, Stihl's promotional communications manager. "One thing customers are demanding is for performance to still be there. It's cool to have a battery-operated mower, but if it only gets halfway across the yard, that's not very cool."
Jerry Clifford has received the prestigious 100% Club award for his success as a real estate agent in the Minneapolis real estate area. He is certified as an ePRO and prides himself on attention to detail. If you need help in your search for Plymouth Minnesota real estate, visit JerryClifford.com.

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